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Customer Love
for EZ UPC

Thanks for the quick response! I appreciate the great customer service! I also appreciate the service you offer. It’s not many startups that can afford the incredibly high and seemingly unwarranted fees the GS1 gang demand.
Dan Arnold

Right Track Pro

Thank you for attentive and excellent service.

Lori Wellen

I am really impressed at what great customer service you gave.
Thank you. It is really appreciated.

Kara Loker

Tuff Sox

This is fantastic service. Thank you. It’s amazing how something so simple can earn such respect and trust in today’s market place. Much Appreciated.

Mark Hockman

Purfexion

Thank you so much! I appreciate you being so prompt!

Thomas O'Leary

SCOTTEVEST

Thank you for doing that so fast!!! That was so much easier than I thought. I like working with you guys. Your company has always been so helpful and takes the time to answer questions! Hard to find these days.

Cliff Silverman

Karajen Crop.

Thank you so much for such a clear and prompt reply to my email inquiry. I do appreciate the time you took to respond to each of my questions with clarity.

Stella Papadopoulos

Inspirations by Stella

Well, you’ve provided me with some of the best customer service I have had in a long time. Something that is getting pretty rare nowadays.

Thank you so much for answering my questions in such detail. I feel much more comfortable with UPC codes now with the knowledge you have provided me.

If anyone ever needs UPC codes I will be sure to point them in your direction!

Jason Arthur

Thank you for taking the time to call me last night. You have granted me the same level of customer service that I grant my own customers. It takes a special level of dedication to customer satisfaction to do so. This is the kind of customer service that produces success.

Mark Carpenter

GenTent Safety Canopies

This just a warm thank you and a praise report on your staff. One phone operator in particular, Ms. Jodie, I want to thank her for the wonderful knowledge and help that she gave me today when trying to acquire UPC/EAN numbers on behalf of TruVision Entertainment staff. We want to thank you and please keep up the great work!

Anthony J. Perkins, CEO

TruVision Entertainment

WOW! Fantastic service. Eco-Ventures USA will definitely use you again as we develop products.
You can quote me on that.

Shawn Frost, CEO

Eco-Ventures USA

You guys are amazing and have the best customer service in the history of the internet! You can quote me on that!

Brion Riborn

Etymbiotic Music

Thanks a lot Jodie. You guys rock. Great service and thanks for your brilliant support!

Manish

Bellion LLC

Jodie – I just wanted to remember to say thank you for your excellent customer service. Thanks so much!

Jonathan Goldsmith

Good Green Bars

Wow! Thank you for the fast service!

Jason Kirkpatrick

Quest For Arete

Within the past 24 hours I have been most impressed, or rather spellbound, by both the quality of your work and the promptness of service. I did not expect to have my graphics on the same day as the order, and on a Saturday at that. Your company is very much superior to that of any of the other solution companies available.

David Alston

McGill Music Co.

Thank you for the speedy response!

Emily Peterson

Valkyrie Selections

Awesome! Thanks for the SUUUUPER quick turn around. I was adding another product to Amazon….almost done…then…WHAT?….I FORGOT to get another UPC!!! Two minutes later, the order was placed with EZ UPC and like 5 minutes after that (might have been 10, but still obscenely quick) I got my little numbers all tied up with a bow….new product added! High-Fives all around!

Lucas Taylor, Co-Founder

BeadBuster

Excellent! Thank you for the lightning fast response! Great service!!!

Jan Taborsky

Happy Campers

Thank you so much! You guys are the best. I’ll definitely be using your services again.

Samori Coles

Lil' Drummaboy Recordings

Thank you for the very well-written explanation to my question. To be honest, I did not think you would even bother because it was such a small order. You will definitely hear from me soon.

Han Sing Tan

Creatvejuce PTE LTD.

Thank you for being so easy to work with. I thought all businesses like you had left the country.
Thank you so much.

Robert Monahan

Lullaby Tiger Publishing

You guys are amazing! Thanks so much for such a quick response, especially as I’m in the UK and ordered when you should all be in bed!

AD - Fleury Dubai LLC

Safemount UK Ltd

I can’t believe your incredible service. I have bought several barcodes from you, and every time I’m impressed.

Gina Katkin

Lilly Ray Music

You people totally rock! You have some of the best customer service I’ve run into in years. Seriously!

Richard Harvey

Smarter Cookies

Thanks for the quick response! I appreciate the great customer service! I also appreciate the service you offer. It’s not many startups that can afford the incredibly high and seemingly unwarranted fees the GS1 gang demand.

Dan Arnold

Right Track Pro

Wow! After a lot of research and almost spending way too much money, I read about a recommendation for EZ UPC. I called and spoke to Jodie and she pleasantly walked me through the simple and affordable way to order. As a matter of fact, she was so pleasant and courteous that I was sure she was the owner of the company. When she told me that she wasn’t, I was floored!!

Excellent customer service is unfortunately almost non existent in today’s marketplace but not at EZ UPC. Not only was the customer service great, but I asked for a rush order and had it in 10 minutes!! Thanks Jodie—you’re the best! You make me want to create more products so that I can give you more business!!

Christine Kreisher

Thanks for the lightning reply! It’s nice to see great customer service. We will definitely be back soon for more barcodes!  Thanks again!

Diana Hinton

Loving Naturals

Thanks for the fast response and great service! I hope to purchase more in the future.

Richard Babington

Eat 3D

Thank you! You guys are great! Will be ordering again in the future.

David Thomas

Off the Farm Foods, Inc.

OMG thank you so much for the prompt response to my order!!! You guys are great. Have a wonderful day!

Lisa Winger

WinBach Marketing Images

Thank you for responding so quickly. You’re great!

Debbie Swoope

Latria, LLC

Impressive Service. Thanks!

Gene Hammond

Fuel Baron Inc.

Thank you for all of your help my questions.   I am of the firm belief that when you become a transparent and trusted resource it breeds success – you are that to me.  For that you have my gratitude.  I know it was only one sale – but we hope it shall grow with you.

Clayton Balmes

I would really like to congratulate you guys on the level of customer service I received working with you. You guys would follow up with me via email and even took the time to call me on more than one occasion. This has made me feel like a valued customer and I will not only continue to use you for my project, but I will recommend you to anyone and everyone that might need your services. God bless you guys. I am truly thankful.

Vaughaligan "Von Won" Walwyn

Reel Talk Worldwide

If you ever need a recommendation from a very small business please ask I will do everything I can. Thanks again.

Robert Smith

Hi Jodie, Thank you for your attention to detail and cheerful service. Keep up the good work. Hope to work with you in the future as we sell more cards.

Glen Booth

Vibrant Colors

I have done business online for years and have never had such efficient and fast service. I am totally impressed with EZUPC as a first rate company that delivers all that they promise—and then some.  Thanks so very much. It has been a delight doing business with you.

Ken Crause

Thank you very much for your prompt service. I will certainly recommend you to other clients.

Claudia Becker

Flapjack Toys

I want to thank you for NOT ripping people off and charging too much as others do. Your service was prompt and courteous. Thank you.

Kelly Hall

Plasticorp

Called a couple of times to ask some questions. Talked with a lady by the name of Jodie. Just wanted to say… she gave me excellent service. Guided me nicely through the barcode process. Will be ordering through you guys.

Babi Bleau

Thank you for taking the time to help me today, I really appreciate it. Your web site was easy to navigate and customer service on the phone OUTSTANDING!

Lynn Jurgen

Shower SpeX

Thank you for your prompt attention to my order!!! It makes my job a lot easier knowing I can forget things until the last moment and have someone like you there!  🙂

Angela Holzer

Good Sound Publishing

Thank you for the quick response. I never thought it would be this easy to get a UPC! I just placed another order.

Chet Brzezinski

Great Lakes Nutrition

Thank you for the speedy turnaround. I’m excited to begin using my UPC codes for my products.

Shawn Mulligan

Keona Candles

I thought the process was easy, quickly executed and affordable.

Debbie Thomas

School for the Service Arts, Inc.

Thank you. Not many companies share the same values we do. While making money is important, doing something you enjoy and are proud of is what’s most important.

Debby Ware

Debby Ware Knitwares LLC

My experience with EZ UPC has been excellent. EZ UPC supplied the order quickly, accurately and competitively. When I asked for EAN’s, they didn’t just send them; they went out of their way to make sure I understood how it works internationally so I would avoid mistakes.

Carl Murphy

Business Development Manager, Morph Products Inc.

Thanks again! You all are so amazingly helpful! I wish the entire country believed in the customer service that you offer.

Michelle Romero

Thank you so much for sending the barcodes to quickly!! Next time I need barcodes I will be purchasing from you.

Jennifer Edison

Thanks for you fast service & great customer care.

Linda Bronsart

High Country Iron

Thanks a million!!! You’re the best! At this price and this kind of service, I’ll return to buy a couple of more soon.

Cristian Anuta

Thank you Thank you Thank you!!! You guys are great!!!I didnt even have timeto write you an email and I had my codes! Such good customer service!!! 2thumbs up here!!!

Hildi Kehler

Thank you very much for your outstanding service.

E. Moreiro

Moreiro Atelier

Thank you for the awesome service!

Frank Perez

La Candela

Thanks Julia!
Perfect customer service 😏

Veronica Bella

You guys are fantastic and so easy to work with. Much better pricing than the GS1 Company here in Australia and my clients are so appreciative of the service you offer.  I shall continue to recommend EZ UPC in all instances.

Nathan Boxx

WOW! You guys are FAST!

Blaine Hone

BD Global

Hi again Ms. Jodie,
Forgot to thank you for the lightening fast response. This tells me a lot about your company.
Means you are sincere and care about what you guys are doing.

Jody Cruzan

Cruzan Strings

You guys are amazing! Thank you!   A+

Kevin Mack

Vice President, NEO Innovations Inc.

Thanks for your very prompt response. It is very much appreciated.

Peter Frank

Product Innovation

Thank you Very, Very, Much!  You guys are the best. Great Service, always prompt.  Appreciate it!

Mark Wenberg

Velocity Archery

Can’t thank you enough for doing this so quickly! You saved me a big delay. YOU ROCK!!!!!

Lisa Daily

Interactive Motivation

You guys are great. Just good service at a good price.

Gary Castell

Magnum Plastics, Inc.

Thank you so much for the speedy delivery!

Rainbow Shultz

Joey's Handheld Pancakes

Jodie, I must say you are on TOP of things over there…especially for a Sat. night!! I looked at other sites today and found UPC’s for much less, but the service over here alone is worth its weight in gold!!

Ken Affolter

Supplement Center

Thank you so much for your help and quick service today!!  Amazing!

Richard Waters

Proprietary Innovation Labs

Thank you for the quantity price break credit you gave me! This is very impressive customer service!

Donna Charloff

MiniLuxe

Thank you for being so highly efficient and for the quick service!

Justine Curgenven

Cackle TV Productions

I have never once done this before, but after dealing with this site, I have to. I just want to say thank you to everyone at this site. Holy cow. I wish every site was this customer friendly, helpful, knowledgeable and very easy to deal with. it’s no surprise that this is a successful company since it’s run so well. I’ve never had a better online shopping experience. Thanks for being so great to your customers and making things easy for us. If I ever need another UPC, I know exactly where I’m going to. Never change your incredible business approach!

Jake Jensen

Jakes Cookies Co

Thank you for processing my order so quickly. I appreciate the quality of your service.

Scott Walters

Thank you so much for your response. I value your input and I agree about making all of the prices the same.  I also want to say that I love your website. It has valuable information that was not on other sites. AND I really appreciate that you got back to me about my question!

Raejean Prather

Shadows Treasure Trunk

Thank you so much for your surprisingly fast response. Thank you also for sorting out my dilemma. You have one incredibly satisfied customer.

Richard Castillo

Reluctant Records

My experience getting our new UPC code from your company was very easy and the customer service I received from Jodie was exceptional!  Thank you again EZ UPC. It is much appreciated!

Richard Fountain

SmartKleanOhio

Thank you so very much for the extraordinarily quick turnaround! I appreciate your help and I will continue to do business with you in the future!!

Linda Kimberly

SokheChapke Publishing, Inc.

This works fantastic. You rock guys!   Thanks for being so quick.  Will continue to work with you.

Dana Callahan

Jordan Trading

Thank you ever so much! I will continue to tell other people needing your services just how good you are!

Michael Godard

Triple M Enterprises

Thank you so much. Your company is the best!! I am soooo used to dealing with companies that don’t care a lot about customer relations. You stand out as an example of one that will be around for many years because you care and are building a loyal user base

William Combs

Cookie Combs

Thank you for such good service!

Dwight Allen

Allen Bee Company

Very easy checkout and by far the best site I have found! Thank you!!!

Tim Durham

Durham's Bee Farm, Inc.

Thanks Jodie! I appreciate the quick response!

Steve Ducey

The Ad Group

Your service and graphics were excellent for our printers to do their job. SUPER PRODUCT AND GREAT SERVICE! Thanks!

Robert Otte

EZ Hook

Thank you very much for your fast service. I really appreciate the professional service and the accurate way you processed the job.

Walid Takrouri

White Heart

You guys rock. Very impressed on your customer service.

Tim Berti

Silicon Valley Personnel

This is exactly what was required, thanks.   You have been a pleasure to work with. I look forward to doing business with your company again in the very near future.

Ann-Marie King

A Eleane King Enterprises

Your customer support is exemplary! That is priceless.  I will certainly model our customer support after yours and I wish everyone else would.

Dillon LaBonte

Bandvino

Many thanks. Received order this morning. Thank you for the great service. We will be back.   All the best from down under in Australia.

William Hutton

Hi Jodie, I just wanted to reply to say how much we appreciate your promptness and professionalism in getting back to us on our concerns.  Blessings to you and your company always.

Darryl and Tina T Howard

Morning Star Studio Productions

Thanks for the VERY fast response. Excellent communication and follow through.

Marc Barrios

Thanks for getting this over to me as soon as you did. I really appreciated all the support and attention to my needs this morning.

Cindy Gavello

Thank you, I’m a consultant for aspiring authors and will highly recommend your services!

Felice Gerwitz

Media Angels, Inc.

Thank you for being the company you are that is not greedy and provides great service. We are a new company and that resonates with us. Have a great day.

Lane Michel

I’m back for more. Thanks for helping small companies like mine get affordable UPC codes. I’ve read your story about how you came to possess the bar code and I surmise that someone must have learned an important lesson somewhere in life . . . it is better to share than to hoard. Thanks again.

Alma Ramsey

Thank you for perfect service. I definitely will get my future UPC numbers from your company again.

Eric Zandi

CEO-ZANDI LLC

Thank you. We have been amazed by the speed and professionalism of your company, not to mention the cost. Those other companies that advertise as ‘official’ ought to be ashamed of themselves. How do they sleep at night?

Nick Bradshaw

TMC Limited

Thank you much. Your customer service is outstanding! Please let me know what other products you carry.

TB

PM Designs

I want to express my great appreciation for your prompt response to my order for a UPC. I received the number and bar codes within a matter of a few hours, and I was able to efficiently use my time in readying my product for sale. Thank you again for your outstanding service.

Ingo Bischoff

President Economic Club of San Francisco

GREAT SERVICE! Thank you very much!

Vladimir Algin and Abbe Rous

WOW!! Thank you for filling our order so quickly. I cannot begin to express my gratitude and surprise!! I could not tell you how to improve.

We will be buying more codes next year and I will certainly refer you to my friends and contacts. I couldn’t be happier. With so much of business being a challenge, it is so nice to have an easy stress free experience.

Maha Khan

Pyknyk

Thank you so much.  I appreciate the speed and professional way that you and your company handles customer service. I promise that next time the order will be placed weeks in advance.

Charles Campbell

Select TALK Radio Network, LLC

Finally a UPC company who knows what they are doing. Very fast order processing plus they generate vector EPS (really the only way to get real crisp UPC graphics) besides the JPG’s and TIF’s.

DuWayne Rocus

Extreme Inkjet

Thank you for all of your help. We have generated perfect bar codes and labels! I do appreciate your fast response time and your advice.

MaryAnn Larson

I have done business with your company a number of times and think you offer a great service!

Owen Barker

Curio Cards

I am fascinated with the speed at which my ordered UPC/EAN codes arrived within less than the expected 24 hours. Moreover, the three graphics formats sent to for each code provides me with flexibility in designing in my labels. Thanks for setting free the small-scale manufacturer, especially from the third world countries. And, of course, thanks for the cheapest prices one can get anywhere. I will go for more.

Yassin Maisikeli

BASUMA INDUSTRIAL COMPANY LTD

Why Buy From EZ UPC

Read why you can can trust us when you buy your UPC (or EAN) codes from us.

Reviews

See our Customer Love in their own words since 2007. We don't do social media sites, fake stuff or hype—we keep it real.

Before You Buy

The things you really need to know when it comes to buying barcodes for your products.

Just the Facts

This is the No BS TL;DR—What you need to know and nothing more, nothing less.

Guarantees

We're the ONLY UPC Reseller site that offers you a No-Risk Money Back Guarantee simply because we aren't greedy.

FAQs

Answers to all your questions about barcodes for your products

EZUPC We're Your UPC Easy Button! Your most honest, reliable source for low-cost verified UPC Barcodes since 2007.
What is a GTIN? A UPC? An EAN?

Excerpted from Wikipedia:
"Global Trade Item Number (GTIN) is an identifier for trade items developed by GS1 (comprising the former EAN International and Uniform Code Council)[citation needed]. Such identifiers are used to look up product information in a database (often by inputting the number through a bar code scanner pointed at an actual product) which may belong to a retailer, manufacturer, collector, researcher, or other entity. The uniqueness and universality of the identifier is useful in establishing which product in one database corresponds to which product in another database, especially across organizational boundaries.

GTIN is an "umbrella" term used to describe the entire family of GS1 data structures for trade items (products and services) identification. GTINs may be 8, 12, 13 or 14 digits long, and can be constructed using any of four numbering structures, depending upon the exact application. GTIN-8s will be encoded in an EAN-8 bar code. GTIN-12s may be shown in UPC-A, ITF-14, or GS1-128 bar codes. GTIN-13s may be encoded in EAN-13, ITF-14 or GS1-128 bar codes, and GTIN-14s may be encoded in ITF-14 or GS1-128 bar codes. The choice of bar code will depend on the application; for example, items to be sold at a retail should be marked with EAN-8, EAN-13, UPC-A or UPC-E bar codes."

UPC stands for for Universal Product Code and references a unique 11-digit GTIN assigned to an individual product. The UPC was invented in 1973 by George Laurer under contract by IBM as a solution for the grocery store industry to track and control inventory and distribution. An actual number in barcode format ends up with 12 digits because the 12th digit is called the “check digit” and is calculated based on the 11 assigned numbers as a redundancy check in case of data entry error. The check digit validates the reliability of the UPC by adding together the 11 numbers and reducing them to a single value. A GTIN-12 and a UPC-12 are the same thing and it will take many, many years for the world marketplace to accept the use of the new term "GTIN-12" in place of "UPC". The UPC will probably never go away, only the name will eventually be commonly known as "GTIN-12". Just as musicians still refer to their recordings as "records" instead of "CDs" even though vinyl records aren't used anymore, there will likely be a huge percentage of the world population that will always refer to a GTIN-12 as a UPC.

An EAN stands for European Article Number and is simply a 13-digit barcode version of a GTIN, also known as a GTIN-13. The extra digit that allows for country identification. The country flag merely indicates from which country the range of numbers was assigned. It does not indicate the location or ownership or origin of the product using the number. According to George Laurer, many countries are using the same symbol with their identifying country flag, but chose to call the symbol by other names. An example is JAN (Japanese Article Number), the Japanese version. The UPC symbol has truly become worldwide and all barcoding software is programmed to read UPC barcodes, however not all companies have updated their software in North America, and therefore not all North American retailers are able to read 13-digit EAN codes. Retailers were requested to implement the upgrade in 2005, however there are still some who have not done it.

Who needs and uses GTINs/UPCs and Bar codes?
When you go to sell your product at a retail outlet, that retailer will have you fill out a product information form which tells them the details of your product. Every retail outlet keeps track of their inventory—no matter how small. Unless your retailer is the vegetable stand at the farmer’s market, they probably have an inventory system that is based on bar codes in order to keep track of the products they sell, what price, and where they get the product.

 

 

 

 

A product information form is where you will put your company info, product details, and enter the 12-digit UPC (GTIN 12) that is assigned to each of your products. If you are selling t-shirts, a blue large t-shirt needs to have a separate UPC from a pink large t-shirt. If you are selling jam, strawberry 16 oz. needs to have a separate UPC from 4 oz. strawberry. Based on the information you fill out on your form, and the corresponding bar code you put on your product(s), when the retailer scans your product bar code at the register it will call up the information in their system that was provided on your form and therefore gives you credit for the sale. So to simplify things, a bar code is just the numeric/graphical code that keeps track of your product. It’s an inventory tracking tool.

What is the difference between a UPC, EAN, GTIN and a Barcode?

A UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN is the number assigned to a product sold in a retail store as explained above. A bar code is simply a graphical translation of a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN number into bars and spaces of varying widths. A bar code is designed to be scanned by an optical reader that interprets the bar and space widths and translates that into the number represented by the bars because reading straight lines is easier than numerical digits.

You can have a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN but not have a bar code. You cannot have a bar code that is not based on a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN. You need a bar code in order to have your UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN be scannable by bar code readers in retail stores. You do not need a scannable bar code for online sales—your UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN is sufficient.

The bar code generated by a GTIN-13 (EAN) is exactly the same as its GTIN-12 (UPC) counterpart. The only difference is in the numbers along the bottom of the bars and spaces. There is NO difference in the actual bar code of a UPC and an EAN and bar code scanners do not know the difference between a GTIN-13/EAN and a GTIN-12/UPC. If you have a UPC you do not need an EAN. If you live outside the US you may use an EAN or a UPC. Ask your retailer if they want a 12-digit or 13-digit bar code. We can provide you with both.

 This is a sample UPC (GTIN 12).

  And this is a sample EAN (GTIN 13) of the same number.

You can see that the bars are exactly the same.

Do I need more than one UPC?
You need a UPC and associated bar code for every product variety you are selling. Your UPC (GTIN-12) by itself does not store the information, but when you fill out your product info forms for your products and associate them with your number, you are, in effect, telling retailers the info about your product.

 

 

 

 

Let’s use Jam as an example. Let’s say you create jam in 3 flavors and two sizes: Guava, Strawberry and Strawberry-Guava. You also offer it in two sizes: 8 oz and 16 oz. Therefore you need a UPC for each variety and each size, thus you need 6 separate UPC (GTIN-12)s for your Jam products.

Does every product need a UPC and bar code?
If you are going to sell your product in retail stores that use an inventory system and a bar code price scanning system, then yes, your products need bar codes. If you are selling your product at the local swap meet and there are no price scanners around, then no, you don’t need a UPC bar code. If you are selling your own products in your own store and don't have scanning equipment, then you don't need bar codes, but you still will want to have unique numbers to identify your products. You don't have to have UPC (GTIN-12) numbers for internal use.
Do UPC Barcodes work outside the United States?
Yes, the barcode will work anywhere that either UPC or EAN barcodes are scanned throughout the world. This includes North America (Canada & US), Central America, South America, Europe, the South Pacific including New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, Asia, India and the Middle East—anywhere in the world that scans bar codes on products. However, not all EAN codes can be read by all retailers in North America.
Is a UPC or EAN the same as an ISBN?
Not entirely. The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a 13-digit GTIN that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally because of the prefix used (978-979). UPCs are for retail products other than books and magazines. You can obtain an ISBN number at ISBN.org. However they will attempt to charge you an additional $25 for your actual bar code at the time of your purchase through their partner company Bowker Barcodes. You do not need to pay that exhorbitant price. We can create your bar code based on your ISBN number for only $2.99 and it will be provided in more formats and better quality than Bowker Barcodes.

If you are publishing a magazine, you may need a Bipad number, not an ISBN (it depends on your distributor—a Bipad is just a UPC but under a certain prefix and it is antiquated but some still use it). If necessary, obtain your Bipad number from bipad.com and then pay us to create your actual bar code for only $2.99. They refer you to a company called Pips that will lead you on a wild goose chase of technical garb that actually doesn’t say or mean anything in an attempt to confuse you into thinking they are more legitimate than other companies.

What kind of data is stored in my barcode?
Technically none. The lines and spaces are simply a glyph that translates your number into lines that can be read by an optical reader. The data about your product, such as price and product size and name, is up to you to provide your retailers when you fill out your product information form. If you are not consistent with your information that you provide, it is possible that Retailer A will show your product as one thing, and Retailer B will show it as another. Therefore it’s important that you make sure you are consistent with your product information that you are associating with your GTINs/UPCs. In 2006 the GS1 launched a new bar code that actually will store data called the GS1 Databar. It is only up the manufacturer/product packager if you choose to use it or not. It will not change how your product is scanned in the retail marketplace.
Can I make my own barcodes?
Yes. You can make your own barcode graphics files from the numbers you buy, but you may not make up your own numbers. There are software programs you can buy if you have a lot of barcodes to make. It will be more cost-effective for you to do it that way, providing you know how to use the software. There are also websites claiming to offer free barcode generating, however the quality of the graphic file provided is often not sufficient to meet GS1 optical reader specs.

If you use our low-priced barcode service you will be getting a guaranteed barcode in multiple professional file formats that will definitely work on your product labeling when printed within GS1 specs (no less than 80% size, no more than 200%, and dark lines on light background, printed at 600 dpi or more). Another thing to watch out for is barcode fonts. While you can obtain the Code 39A font to translate numbers into barcode lines and spaces, you need to make sure you understand the output requirements in terms of size and resolution so you barcodes are scannable. You also need to make sure you have calculated your check digit correctly.

Also beware of costly barcode services such as Bowker Barcodes, as referred on the ISBN.org website. They charge $25 for the exact same service that we charge $2.99 at our sister site My Barcode Graphics and we actually give you more file formats and better quality. If you need a lot of barcodes (more than 20) we offer bulk pricing.

What if my UPC is the same as someone else’s?
Whether you purchase your UPC (GTIN-12) from the GS1 or us, your number will never be duplicated. We are assigned a group of numbers within our manufacturer’s prefixes that we rightfully own and any numbers within that group will never be duplicated by us. When we assign you numbers we provide you with a Certificate of Ownership, Authenticity and Uniqueness, stating that your number(s) are unique and will never be assigned or used for another product. If you ever come across another product with the same UPC as the one issued to you by EZ UPC, contact us immediately.
Does my UPC have an expiration date?
No. Just like our manufacturer’s prefixes that were assigned by the Uniform Code Council (now the GS1), your UPC will not expire, as it is a subset of one of our prefixes and those prefixes were assigned to us as a company asset in perpetuity (forever). Your purchase agreement and certificate of authenticity confirm this also.
Am I required to have UPCs for my products?
Technically no, however in today’s world most all retailers use UPC bar codes as an inventory/pricing control. It really is up to your retailer. If you are selling your products yourself at the swap meet or farmer’s market, then you don’t need UPCs.
What is a GTIN? A UPC? An EAN?

Excerpted from Wikipedia:
"Global Trade Item Number (GTIN) is an identifier for trade items developed by GS1 (comprising the former EAN International and Uniform Code Council)[citation needed]. Such identifiers are used to look up product information in a database (often by inputting the number through a bar code scanner pointed at an actual product) which may belong to a retailer, manufacturer, collector, researcher, or other entity. The uniqueness and universality of the identifier is useful in establishing which product in one database corresponds to which product in another database, especially across organizational boundaries.

GTIN is an "umbrella" term used to describe the entire family of GS1 data structures for trade items (products and services) identification. GTINs may be 8, 12, 13 or 14 digits long, and can be constructed using any of four numbering structures, depending upon the exact application. GTIN-8s will be encoded in an EAN-8 bar code. GTIN-12s may be shown in UPC-A, ITF-14, or GS1-128 bar codes. GTIN-13s may be encoded in EAN-13, ITF-14 or GS1-128 bar codes, and GTIN-14s may be encoded in ITF-14 or GS1-128 bar codes. The choice of bar code will depend on the application; for example, items to be sold at a retail should be marked with EAN-8, EAN-13, UPC-A or UPC-E bar codes."

UPC stands for for Universal Product Code and references a unique 11-digit GTIN assigned to an individual product. The UPC was invented in 1973 by George Laurer under contract by IBM as a solution for the grocery store industry to track and control inventory and distribution. An actual number in barcode format ends up with 12 digits because the 12th digit is called the “check digit” and is calculated based on the 11 assigned numbers as a redundancy check in case of data entry error. The check digit validates the reliability of the UPC by adding together the 11 numbers and reducing them to a single value. A GTIN-12 and a UPC-12 are the same thing and it will take many, many years for the world marketplace to accept the use of the new term "GTIN-12" in place of "UPC". The UPC will probably never go away, only the name will eventually be commonly known as "GTIN-12". Just as musicians still refer to their recordings as "records" instead of "CDs" even though vinyl records aren't used anymore, there will likely be a huge percentage of the world population that will always refer to a GTIN-12 as a UPC.

An EAN stands for European Article Number and is simply a 13-digit barcode version of a GTIN, also known as a GTIN-13. The extra digit that allows for country identification. The country flag merely indicates from which country the range of numbers was assigned. It does not indicate the location or ownership or origin of the product using the number. According to George Laurer, many countries are using the same symbol with their identifying country flag, but chose to call the symbol by other names. An example is JAN (Japanese Article Number), the Japanese version. The UPC symbol has truly become worldwide and all barcoding software is programmed to read UPC barcodes, however not all companies have updated their software in North America, and therefore not all North American retailers are able to read 13-digit EAN codes. Retailers were requested to implement the upgrade in 2005, however there are still some who have not done it.

Who needs and uses GTINs/UPCs and Bar codes?
When you go to sell your product at a retail outlet, that retailer will have you fill out a product information form which tells them the details of your product. Every retail outlet keeps track of their inventory—no matter how small. Unless your retailer is the vegetable stand at the farmer’s market, they probably have an inventory system that is based on bar codes in order to keep track of the products they sell, what price, and where they get the product.

 

 

 

 

A product information form is where you will put your company info, product details, and enter the 12-digit UPC (GTIN 12) that is assigned to each of your products. If you are selling t-shirts, a blue large t-shirt needs to have a separate UPC from a pink large t-shirt. If you are selling jam, strawberry 16 oz. needs to have a separate UPC from 4 oz. strawberry. Based on the information you fill out on your form, and the corresponding bar code you put on your product(s), when the retailer scans your product bar code at the register it will call up the information in their system that was provided on your form and therefore gives you credit for the sale. So to simplify things, a bar code is just the numeric/graphical code that keeps track of your product. It’s an inventory tracking tool.

What is the difference between a UPC, EAN, GTIN and a Barcode?

A UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN is the number assigned to a product sold in a retail store as explained above. A bar code is simply a graphical translation of a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN number into bars and spaces of varying widths. A bar code is designed to be scanned by an optical reader that interprets the bar and space widths and translates that into the number represented by the bars because reading straight lines is easier than numerical digits.

You can have a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN but not have a bar code. You cannot have a bar code that is not based on a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN. You need a bar code in order to have your UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN be scannable by bar code readers in retail stores. You do not need a scannable bar code for online sales—your UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN is sufficient.

The bar code generated by a GTIN-13 (EAN) is exactly the same as its GTIN-12 (UPC) counterpart. The only difference is in the numbers along the bottom of the bars and spaces. There is NO difference in the actual bar code of a UPC and an EAN and bar code scanners do not know the difference between a GTIN-13/EAN and a GTIN-12/UPC. If you have a UPC you do not need an EAN. If you live outside the US you may use an EAN or a UPC. Ask your retailer if they want a 12-digit or 13-digit bar code. We can provide you with both.

 This is a sample UPC (GTIN 12).

  And this is a sample EAN (GTIN 13) of the same number.

You can see that the bars are exactly the same.

What is the GS1?

"GS1 is a leading global organisation dedicated to the design and implementation of global standards and solutions to improve the efficiency and visibility of supply and demand chains globally and across sectors. The GS1 system of standards is the most widely used supply chain standards system in the world."

"GS1's main activity is the development of the GS1 System , a series of standards designed to improve supply chain management. Much of the development is initiated by its Member Organisations (MOs). Companies wishing to use the GS1 System should apply for membership to a Member Organisation. Companies in countries where there is no MO can obtain their membership directly from GS1 Global Office. "

"The GS1 System is an integrated system of global standards that provides for accurate identification and communication of information regarding products, assets, services and locations. It is the most implemented supply chain standards system in the world."

The GS1 used to be the Uniform Grocery Product Code Council, originally established in the 1970s to help standardize product tracking for the grocery store industry. The UGPCC became the UCC in September 1974. The European Article Numbering (EAN) Association launched in Belgium 1974 to work with the UCC on global numbering solutions. In June 2003 the EAN became the GS1. You can read the entire evolution timeline on the GS1 site here: http://www.gs1.org/about/media_centre/

Do I need more than one UPC?
You need a UPC and associated bar code for every product variety you are selling. Your UPC (GTIN-12) by itself does not store the information, but when you fill out your product info forms for your products and associate them with your number, you are, in effect, telling retailers the info about your product.

 

 

 

 

Let’s use Jam as an example. Let’s say you create jam in 3 flavors and two sizes: Guava, Strawberry and Strawberry-Guava. You also offer it in two sizes: 8 oz and 16 oz. Therefore you need a UPC for each variety and each size, thus you need 6 separate UPC (GTIN-12)s for your Jam products.

Does every product need a UPC and bar code?
If you are going to sell your product in retail stores that use an inventory system and a bar code price scanning system, then yes, your products need bar codes. If you are selling your product at the local swap meet and there are no price scanners around, then no, you don’t need a UPC bar code. If you are selling your own products in your own store and don't have scanning equipment, then you don't need bar codes, but you still will want to have unique numbers to identify your products. You don't have to have UPC (GTIN-12) numbers for internal use.
Do UPC Barcodes work outside the United States?
Yes, the barcode will work anywhere that either UPC or EAN barcodes are scanned throughout the world. This includes North America (Canada & US), Central America, South America, Europe, the South Pacific including New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, Asia, India and the Middle East—anywhere in the world that scans bar codes on products. However, not all EAN codes can be read by all retailers in North America.
Is a UPC or EAN the same as an ISBN?
Not entirely. The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a 13-digit GTIN that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally because of the prefix used (978-979). UPCs are for retail products other than books and magazines. You can obtain an ISBN number at ISBN.org. However they will attempt to charge you an additional $25 for your actual bar code at the time of your purchase through their partner company Bowker Barcodes. You do not need to pay that exhorbitant price. We can create your bar code based on your ISBN number for only $2.99 and it will be provided in more formats and better quality than Bowker Barcodes.

If you are publishing a magazine, you may need a Bipad number, not an ISBN (it depends on your distributor—a Bipad is just a UPC but under a certain prefix and it is antiquated but some still use it). If necessary, obtain your Bipad number from bipad.com and then pay us to create your actual bar code for only $2.99. They refer you to a company called Pips that will lead you on a wild goose chase of technical garb that actually doesn’t say or mean anything in an attempt to confuse you into thinking they are more legitimate than other companies.

Can I make my own barcodes?
Yes. You can make your own barcode graphics files from the numbers you buy, but you may not make up your own numbers. There are software programs you can buy if you have a lot of barcodes to make. It will be more cost-effective for you to do it that way, providing you know how to use the software. There are also websites claiming to offer free barcode generating, however the quality of the graphic file provided is often not sufficient to meet GS1 optical reader specs.

If you use our low-priced barcode service you will be getting a guaranteed barcode in multiple professional file formats that will definitely work on your product labeling when printed within GS1 specs (no less than 80% size, no more than 200%, and dark lines on light background, printed at 600 dpi or more). Another thing to watch out for is barcode fonts. While you can obtain the Code 39A font to translate numbers into barcode lines and spaces, you need to make sure you understand the output requirements in terms of size and resolution so you barcodes are scannable. You also need to make sure you have calculated your check digit correctly.

Also beware of costly barcode services such as Bowker Barcodes, as referred on the ISBN.org website. They charge $25 for the exact same service that we charge $2.99 at our sister site My Barcode Graphics and we actually give you more file formats and better quality. If you need a lot of barcodes (more than 20) we offer bulk pricing.

What if my UPC is the same as someone else’s?
Whether you purchase your UPC (GTIN-12) from the GS1 or us, your number will never be duplicated. We are assigned a group of numbers within our manufacturer’s prefixes that we rightfully own and any numbers within that group will never be duplicated by us. When we assign you numbers we provide you with a Certificate of Ownership, Authenticity and Uniqueness, stating that your number(s) are unique and will never be assigned or used for another product. If you ever come across another product with the same UPC as the one issued to you by EZ UPC, contact us immediately.
Does my UPC have an expiration date?
No. Just like our manufacturer’s prefixes that were assigned by the Uniform Code Council (now the GS1), your UPC will not expire, as it is a subset of one of our prefixes and those prefixes were assigned to us as a company asset in perpetuity (forever). Your purchase agreement and certificate of authenticity confirm this also.
What if my UPC doesn’t work or a retailer won’t accept it?
Some Walmart stores or regions, and some Kroger Family Grocery stores (such as superstore Fred Meyer) might not accept your subset numbers(s) if they are not purchased through the GS1–they require your own GS1 certificate. We also have reports of people successfully submitting their numbers and providing their certificate from us to these stores and not being asked for a GS1 Certificate.

What we have found is that if you are working with Walmart and Kroger stores at a local level, they don't get involved in the GS1 politics. It's only when you get a national distribution contract that requires you to work with their Corporate Headquarters or on a National level and submit your product data to a certified Data Pool, that they are strict about enforcing the political rule that you must provide an ownership certificate directly from the GS1.

Other stores that have been reported to require a GS1 Certificate as well as an owned company prefix in recent years include: Macy's, Bloomingdales, Lowes, Walgreens, Target, however we also have many customers who have used our numbers in those stores over the years. It's a bit hit or miss these days as the GS1 and the Global Data Synchronization Network (GDSN) effort becomes more widely used.

Remember, if you get a sizeable contract at a big box retailer, you will likely have to pay the price to go through the GS1 and at that point you can justify the cost depending on the price of the contract. For everyone else, EZ UPC is a cost-effective and hassle-free alternative or a great stepping stone while you are scaling your small business.

We are not responsible for retailers that refuse to accept numbers from a legal reseller or require a GS1 certificate and prefix.

Am I required to have UPCs for my products?
Technically no, however in today’s world most all retailers use UPC bar codes as an inventory/pricing control. It really is up to your retailer. If you are selling your products yourself at the swap meet or farmer’s market, then you don’t need UPCs.
How do I register my UPC?
The GS1 does not register or issue GTINs/UPCs. They issue Global Location Numbers (GLNs) under a manufacturer’s prefix with sets of assigned numbers. When you purchase GTINs/UPCs from EZ UPC, you are purchasing unique numbers under one of our manufacturer’s prefixes that we legally own and can assign to you because we obtained it prior to the lawsuits and changes against the GS1 in 2002.

They have recently added "Trade Item Info" to their database but we, the manufacturers are responsible for providing that information to them and we are not required to. Certified Data Pools have to publish the trade item data to the GDSN in order for Trade Item Info to appear in the GEPIR. If you look up a UPC from a common food product in your refrigerator you'll see the company but probably no info about the product because nobody wants to take the extra time to enter all that info for the GS1's benefit. This should never have an impact on the functionality of your UPC (GTIN 12) in the marketplace. If you get a UPC (GTIN 12) for a music CD, we recommend you register your CD with Nielsen’s Soundscan.com, the database that tracks and reports music sales in North America.

How Fast Does My Order Come?

Your order will be filled immediatley—depending on your quantity it will be instant or if ordering a large quantity such as 1000, it may take up to 15 minutes. All orders are sent via email in the form of a Download link to a Zip File that contains your complete order. You may have to check your spam folder.

Why Isn't EZUPC BBB Accredited?

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is a membership-based organization, kind of like an original Yelp for reviews. They allow anyone to write reviews/make complaints, but if a company wants to respond to those reviews/complaints, they have to join the BBB membership and pay fees.

As such, historically, BBB ratings are largely used by people who have lots of negative ratings so they can try to justify and explain those to their customers.

Thus, the reason why we aren't BBB Accredited is because we don't need to be—we don't have any complaints against us, and thus, why would we pay money to participate in their membership?

What if my UPC is the same as someone else’s?
Whether you purchase your UPC (GTIN-12) from the GS1 or us, your number will never be duplicated. We are assigned a group of numbers within our manufacturer’s prefixes that we rightfully own and any numbers within that group will never be duplicated by us. When we assign you numbers we provide you with a Certificate of Ownership, Authenticity and Uniqueness, stating that your number(s) are unique and will never be assigned or used for another product. If you ever come across another product with the same UPC as the one issued to you by EZ UPC, contact us immediately.
What if my UPC doesn’t work or a retailer won’t accept it?
Some Walmart stores or regions, and some Kroger Family Grocery stores (such as superstore Fred Meyer) might not accept your subset numbers(s) if they are not purchased through the GS1–they require your own GS1 certificate. We also have reports of people successfully submitting their numbers and providing their certificate from us to these stores and not being asked for a GS1 Certificate.

What we have found is that if you are working with Walmart and Kroger stores at a local level, they don't get involved in the GS1 politics. It's only when you get a national distribution contract that requires you to work with their Corporate Headquarters or on a National level and submit your product data to a certified Data Pool, that they are strict about enforcing the political rule that you must provide an ownership certificate directly from the GS1.

Other stores that have been reported to require a GS1 Certificate as well as an owned company prefix in recent years include: Macy's, Bloomingdales, Lowes, Walgreens, Target, however we also have many customers who have used our numbers in those stores over the years. It's a bit hit or miss these days as the GS1 and the Global Data Synchronization Network (GDSN) effort becomes more widely used.

Remember, if you get a sizeable contract at a big box retailer, you will likely have to pay the price to go through the GS1 and at that point you can justify the cost depending on the price of the contract. For everyone else, EZ UPC is a cost-effective and hassle-free alternative or a great stepping stone while you are scaling your small business.

We are not responsible for retailers that refuse to accept numbers from a legal reseller or require a GS1 certificate and prefix.

Who is George Laurer and Why Does it Matter?
George invented the UPC (Uniform Product Code) in 1973 under contract with IBM. He used to maintain a website with all the information about the origin of the UPC, the UCC and the GS1, and also shared details and info about the class action lawsuits against the Uniform Code Council (now the GS1) for monopolizing, as well as lists other legal resellers such as us. We were one of the first resellers he verified and listed on his website. His site used to explain about the mechanics of bar codes and the numbering system, and shared great advice on how to determine if people like us are legal and legitimate and it had a blacklist of websites he had found to be fraudulent or suspicious.

Unfortunately several resellers who made plenty of money off of unsuspecting and trusting customers threatened him with legal action in late 2016 and at 91 years old, he threw in the towel and removed the information on his site that had been there for 15 years. The sad thing is he was only trying to help by giving information so people wouldn’t be victims of fraud.

George passed away in December 2019 at the age of 94. AP News: George Laurer, inventor of ubiquitous UPC, dies at 94

His website can be viewed in the internet Wayback Machine. You have to view prior to 2016 to see the content prior to his removing of the recommended companies (like ours) and those on his Black List, which he removed when he was legally threatened in 2016.

Here is our site on his recommended list in July 2007:

How Fast Does My Order Come?

Your order will be filled immediatley—depending on your quantity it will be instant or if ordering a large quantity such as 1000, it may take up to 15 minutes. All orders are sent via email in the form of a Download link to a Zip File that contains your complete order. You may have to check your spam folder.

What is a GTIN? A UPC? An EAN?

Excerpted from Wikipedia:
"Global Trade Item Number (GTIN) is an identifier for trade items developed by GS1 (comprising the former EAN International and Uniform Code Council)[citation needed]. Such identifiers are used to look up product information in a database (often by inputting the number through a bar code scanner pointed at an actual product) which may belong to a retailer, manufacturer, collector, researcher, or other entity. The uniqueness and universality of the identifier is useful in establishing which product in one database corresponds to which product in another database, especially across organizational boundaries.

GTIN is an "umbrella" term used to describe the entire family of GS1 data structures for trade items (products and services) identification. GTINs may be 8, 12, 13 or 14 digits long, and can be constructed using any of four numbering structures, depending upon the exact application. GTIN-8s will be encoded in an EAN-8 bar code. GTIN-12s may be shown in UPC-A, ITF-14, or GS1-128 bar codes. GTIN-13s may be encoded in EAN-13, ITF-14 or GS1-128 bar codes, and GTIN-14s may be encoded in ITF-14 or GS1-128 bar codes. The choice of bar code will depend on the application; for example, items to be sold at a retail should be marked with EAN-8, EAN-13, UPC-A or UPC-E bar codes."

UPC stands for for Universal Product Code and references a unique 11-digit GTIN assigned to an individual product. The UPC was invented in 1973 by George Laurer under contract by IBM as a solution for the grocery store industry to track and control inventory and distribution. An actual number in barcode format ends up with 12 digits because the 12th digit is called the “check digit” and is calculated based on the 11 assigned numbers as a redundancy check in case of data entry error. The check digit validates the reliability of the UPC by adding together the 11 numbers and reducing them to a single value. A GTIN-12 and a UPC-12 are the same thing and it will take many, many years for the world marketplace to accept the use of the new term "GTIN-12" in place of "UPC". The UPC will probably never go away, only the name will eventually be commonly known as "GTIN-12". Just as musicians still refer to their recordings as "records" instead of "CDs" even though vinyl records aren't used anymore, there will likely be a huge percentage of the world population that will always refer to a GTIN-12 as a UPC.

An EAN stands for European Article Number and is simply a 13-digit barcode version of a GTIN, also known as a GTIN-13. The extra digit that allows for country identification. The country flag merely indicates from which country the range of numbers was assigned. It does not indicate the location or ownership or origin of the product using the number. According to George Laurer, many countries are using the same symbol with their identifying country flag, but chose to call the symbol by other names. An example is JAN (Japanese Article Number), the Japanese version. The UPC symbol has truly become worldwide and all barcoding software is programmed to read UPC barcodes, however not all companies have updated their software in North America, and therefore not all North American retailers are able to read 13-digit EAN codes. Retailers were requested to implement the upgrade in 2005, however there are still some who have not done it.

Who needs and uses GTINs/UPCs and Bar codes?
When you go to sell your product at a retail outlet, that retailer will have you fill out a product information form which tells them the details of your product. Every retail outlet keeps track of their inventory—no matter how small. Unless your retailer is the vegetable stand at the farmer’s market, they probably have an inventory system that is based on bar codes in order to keep track of the products they sell, what price, and where they get the product.

 

 

 

 

A product information form is where you will put your company info, product details, and enter the 12-digit UPC (GTIN 12) that is assigned to each of your products. If you are selling t-shirts, a blue large t-shirt needs to have a separate UPC from a pink large t-shirt. If you are selling jam, strawberry 16 oz. needs to have a separate UPC from 4 oz. strawberry. Based on the information you fill out on your form, and the corresponding bar code you put on your product(s), when the retailer scans your product bar code at the register it will call up the information in their system that was provided on your form and therefore gives you credit for the sale. So to simplify things, a bar code is just the numeric/graphical code that keeps track of your product. It’s an inventory tracking tool.

What is the difference between a UPC, EAN, GTIN and a Barcode?

A UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN is the number assigned to a product sold in a retail store as explained above. A bar code is simply a graphical translation of a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN number into bars and spaces of varying widths. A bar code is designed to be scanned by an optical reader that interprets the bar and space widths and translates that into the number represented by the bars because reading straight lines is easier than numerical digits.

You can have a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN but not have a bar code. You cannot have a bar code that is not based on a UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN. You need a bar code in order to have your UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN be scannable by bar code readers in retail stores. You do not need a scannable bar code for online sales—your UPC (GTIN-12)/EAN is sufficient.

The bar code generated by a GTIN-13 (EAN) is exactly the same as its GTIN-12 (UPC) counterpart. The only difference is in the numbers along the bottom of the bars and spaces. There is NO difference in the actual bar code of a UPC and an EAN and bar code scanners do not know the difference between a GTIN-13/EAN and a GTIN-12/UPC. If you have a UPC you do not need an EAN. If you live outside the US you may use an EAN or a UPC. Ask your retailer if they want a 12-digit or 13-digit bar code. We can provide you with both.

 This is a sample UPC (GTIN 12).

  And this is a sample EAN (GTIN 13) of the same number.

You can see that the bars are exactly the same.

What is the GS1?

"GS1 is a leading global organisation dedicated to the design and implementation of global standards and solutions to improve the efficiency and visibility of supply and demand chains globally and across sectors. The GS1 system of standards is the most widely used supply chain standards system in the world."

"GS1's main activity is the development of the GS1 System , a series of standards designed to improve supply chain management. Much of the development is initiated by its Member Organisations (MOs). Companies wishing to use the GS1 System should apply for membership to a Member Organisation. Companies in countries where there is no MO can obtain their membership directly from GS1 Global Office. "

"The GS1 System is an integrated system of global standards that provides for accurate identification and communication of information regarding products, assets, services and locations. It is the most implemented supply chain standards system in the world."

The GS1 used to be the Uniform Grocery Product Code Council, originally established in the 1970s to help standardize product tracking for the grocery store industry. The UGPCC became the UCC in September 1974. The European Article Numbering (EAN) Association launched in Belgium 1974 to work with the UCC on global numbering solutions. In June 2003 the EAN became the GS1. You can read the entire evolution timeline on the GS1 site here: http://www.gs1.org/about/media_centre/

Why Isn't EZUPC BBB Accredited?

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is a membership-based organization, kind of like an original Yelp for reviews. They allow anyone to write reviews/make complaints, but if a company wants to respond to those reviews/complaints, they have to join the BBB membership and pay fees.

As such, historically, BBB ratings are largely used by people who have lots of negative ratings so they can try to justify and explain those to their customers.

Thus, the reason why we aren't BBB Accredited is because we don't need to be—we don't have any complaints against us, and thus, why would we pay money to participate in their membership?

Do I need more than one UPC?
You need a UPC and associated bar code for every product variety you are selling. Your UPC (GTIN-12) by itself does not store the information, but when you fill out your product info forms for your products and associate them with your number, you are, in effect, telling retailers the info about your product.

 

 

 

 

Let’s use Jam as an example. Let’s say you create jam in 3 flavors and two sizes: Guava, Strawberry and Strawberry-Guava. You also offer it in two sizes: 8 oz and 16 oz. Therefore you need a UPC for each variety and each size, thus you need 6 separate UPC (GTIN-12)s for your Jam products.

Does every product need a UPC and bar code?
If you are going to sell your product in retail stores that use an inventory system and a bar code price scanning system, then yes, your products need bar codes. If you are selling your product at the local swap meet and there are no price scanners around, then no, you don’t need a UPC bar code. If you are selling your own products in your own store and don't have scanning equipment, then you don't need bar codes, but you still will want to have unique numbers to identify your products. You don't have to have UPC (GTIN-12) numbers for internal use.
Do UPC Barcodes work outside the United States?
Yes, the barcode will work anywhere that either UPC or EAN barcodes are scanned throughout the world. This includes North America (Canada & US), Central America, South America, Europe, the South Pacific including New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, Asia, India and the Middle East—anywhere in the world that scans bar codes on products. However, not all EAN codes can be read by all retailers in North America.
Is a UPC or EAN the same as an ISBN?
Not entirely. The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a 13-digit GTIN that uniquely identifies books and book-like products published internationally because of the prefix used (978-979). UPCs are for retail products other than books and magazines. You can obtain an ISBN number at ISBN.org. However they will attempt to charge you an additional $25 for your actual bar code at the time of your purchase through their partner company Bowker Barcodes. You do not need to pay that exhorbitant price. We can create your bar code based on your ISBN number for only $2.99 and it will be provided in more formats and better quality than Bowker Barcodes.

If you are publishing a magazine, you may need a Bipad number, not an ISBN (it depends on your distributor—a Bipad is just a UPC but under a certain prefix and it is antiquated but some still use it). If necessary, obtain your Bipad number from bipad.com and then pay us to create your actual bar code for only $2.99. They refer you to a company called Pips that will lead you on a wild goose chase of technical garb that actually doesn’t say or mean anything in an attempt to confuse you into thinking they are more legitimate than other companies.

What kind of data is stored in my barcode?
Technically none. The lines and spaces are simply a glyph that translates your number into lines that can be read by an optical reader. The data about your product, such as price and product size and name, is up to you to provide your retailers when you fill out your product information form. If you are not consistent with your information that you provide, it is possible that Retailer A will show your product as one thing, and Retailer B will show it as another. Therefore it’s important that you make sure you are consistent with your product information that you are associating with your GTINs/UPCs. In 2006 the GS1 launched a new bar code that actually will store data called the GS1 Databar. It is only up the manufacturer/product packager if you choose to use it or not. It will not change how your product is scanned in the retail marketplace.
Can I make my own barcodes?
Yes. You can make your own barcode graphics files from the numbers you buy, but you may not make up your own numbers. There are software programs you can buy if you have a lot of barcodes to make. It will be more cost-effective for you to do it that way, providing you know how to use the software. There are also websites claiming to offer free barcode generating, however the quality of the graphic file provided is often not sufficient to meet GS1 optical reader specs.

If you use our low-priced barcode service you will be getting a guaranteed barcode in multiple professional file formats that will definitely work on your product labeling when printed within GS1 specs (no less than 80% size, no more than 200%, and dark lines on light background, printed at 600 dpi or more). Another thing to watch out for is barcode fonts. While you can obtain the Code 39A font to translate numbers into barcode lines and spaces, you need to make sure you understand the output requirements in terms of size and resolution so you barcodes are scannable. You also need to make sure you have calculated your check digit correctly.

Also beware of costly barcode services such as Bowker Barcodes, as referred on the ISBN.org website. They charge $25 for the exact same service that we charge $2.99 at our sister site My Barcode Graphics and we actually give you more file formats and better quality. If you need a lot of barcodes (more than 20) we offer bulk pricing.

What if my UPC is the same as someone else’s?
Whether you purchase your UPC (GTIN-12) from the GS1 or us, your number will never be duplicated. We are assigned a group of numbers within our manufacturer’s prefixes that we rightfully own and any numbers within that group will never be duplicated by us. When we assign you numbers we provide you with a Certificate of Ownership, Authenticity and Uniqueness, stating that your number(s) are unique and will never be assigned or used for another product. If you ever come across another product with the same UPC as the one issued to you by EZ UPC, contact us immediately.
Does my UPC have an expiration date?
No. Just like our manufacturer’s prefixes that were assigned by the Uniform Code Council (now the GS1), your UPC will not expire, as it is a subset of one of our prefixes and those prefixes were assigned to us as a company asset in perpetuity (forever). Your purchase agreement and certificate of authenticity confirm this also.
What if my UPC doesn’t work or a retailer won’t accept it?
Some Walmart stores or regions, and some Kroger Family Grocery stores (such as superstore Fred Meyer) might not accept your subset numbers(s) if they are not purchased through the GS1–they require your own GS1 certificate. We also have reports of people successfully submitting their numbers and providing their certificate from us to these stores and not being asked for a GS1 Certificate.

What we have found is that if you are working with Walmart and Kroger stores at a local level, they don't get involved in the GS1 politics. It's only when you get a national distribution contract that requires you to work with their Corporate Headquarters or on a National level and submit your product data to a certified Data Pool, that they are strict about enforcing the political rule that you must provide an ownership certificate directly from the GS1.

Other stores that have been reported to require a GS1 Certificate as well as an owned company prefix in recent years include: Macy's, Bloomingdales, Lowes, Walgreens, Target, however we also have many customers who have used our numbers in those stores over the years. It's a bit hit or miss these days as the GS1 and the Global Data Synchronization Network (GDSN) effort becomes more widely used.

Remember, if you get a sizeable contract at a big box retailer, you will likely have to pay the price to go through the GS1 and at that point you can justify the cost depending on the price of the contract. For everyone else, EZ UPC is a cost-effective and hassle-free alternative or a great stepping stone while you are scaling your small business.

We are not responsible for retailers that refuse to accept numbers from a legal reseller or require a GS1 certificate and prefix.

Am I required to have UPCs for my products?
Technically no, however in today’s world most all retailers use UPC bar codes as an inventory/pricing control. It really is up to your retailer. If you are selling your products yourself at the swap meet or farmer’s market, then you don’t need UPCs.
How do I register my UPC?
The GS1 does not register or issue GTINs/UPCs. They issue Global Location Numbers (GLNs) under a manufacturer’s prefix with sets of assigned numbers. When you purchase GTINs/UPCs from EZ UPC, you are purchasing unique numbers under one of our manufacturer’s prefixes that we legally own and can assign to you because we obtained it prior to the lawsuits and changes against the GS1 in 2002.

They have recently added "Trade Item Info" to their database but we, the manufacturers are responsible for providing that information to them and we are not required to. Certified Data Pools have to publish the trade item data to the GDSN in order for Trade Item Info to appear in the GEPIR. If you look up a UPC from a common food product in your refrigerator you'll see the company but probably no info about the product because nobody wants to take the extra time to enter all that info for the GS1's benefit. This should never have an impact on the functionality of your UPC (GTIN 12) in the marketplace. If you get a UPC (GTIN 12) for a music CD, we recommend you register your CD with Nielsen’s Soundscan.com, the database that tracks and reports music sales in North America.

Who is George Laurer and Why Does it Matter?
George invented the UPC (Uniform Product Code) in 1973 under contract with IBM. He used to maintain a website with all the information about the origin of the UPC, the UCC and the GS1, and also shared details and info about the class action lawsuits against the Uniform Code Council (now the GS1) for monopolizing, as well as lists other legal resellers such as us. We were one of the first resellers he verified and listed on his website. His site used to explain about the mechanics of bar codes and the numbering system, and shared great advice on how to determine if people like us are legal and legitimate and it had a blacklist of websites he had found to be fraudulent or suspicious.

Unfortunately several resellers who made plenty of money off of unsuspecting and trusting customers threatened him with legal action in late 2016 and at 91 years old, he threw in the towel and removed the information on his site that had been there for 15 years. The sad thing is he was only trying to help by giving information so people wouldn’t be victims of fraud.

George passed away in December 2019 at the age of 94. AP News: George Laurer, inventor of ubiquitous UPC, dies at 94

His website can be viewed in the internet Wayback Machine. You have to view prior to 2016 to see the content prior to his removing of the recommended companies (like ours) and those on his Black List, which he removed when he was legally threatened in 2016.

Here is our site on his recommended list in July 2007:

What is the GS1?

"GS1 is a leading global organisation dedicated to the design and implementation of global standards and solutions to improve the efficiency and visibility of supply and demand chains globally and across sectors. The GS1 system of standards is the most widely used supply chain standards system in the world."

"GS1's main activity is the development of the GS1 System , a series of standards designed to improve supply chain management. Much of the development is initiated by its Member Organisations (MOs). Companies wishing to use the GS1 System should apply for membership to a Member Organisation. Companies in countries where there is no MO can obtain their membership directly from GS1 Global Office. "

"The GS1 System is an integrated system of global standards that provides for accurate identification and communication of information regarding products, assets, services and locations. It is the most implemented supply chain standards system in the world."

The GS1 used to be the Uniform Grocery Product Code Council, originally established in the 1970s to help standardize product tracking for the grocery store industry. The UGPCC became the UCC in September 1974. The European Article Numbering (EAN) Association launched in Belgium 1974 to work with the UCC on global numbering solutions. In June 2003 the EAN became the GS1. You can read the entire evolution timeline on the GS1 site here: http://www.gs1.org/about/media_centre/

Who is George Laurer and Why Does it Matter?
George invented the UPC (Uniform Product Code) in 1973 under contract with IBM. He used to maintain a website with all the information about the origin of the UPC, the UCC and the GS1, and also shared details and info about the class action lawsuits against the Uniform Code Council (now the GS1) for monopolizing, as well as lists other legal resellers such as us. We were one of the first resellers he verified and listed on his website. His site used to explain about the mechanics of bar codes and the numbering system, and shared great advice on how to determine if people like us are legal and legitimate and it had a blacklist of websites he had found to be fraudulent or suspicious.

Unfortunately several resellers who made plenty of money off of unsuspecting and trusting customers threatened him with legal action in late 2016 and at 91 years old, he threw in the towel and removed the information on his site that had been there for 15 years. The sad thing is he was only trying to help by giving information so people wouldn’t be victims of fraud.

George passed away in December 2019 at the age of 94. AP News: George Laurer, inventor of ubiquitous UPC, dies at 94

His website can be viewed in the internet Wayback Machine. You have to view prior to 2016 to see the content prior to his removing of the recommended companies (like ours) and those on his Black List, which he removed when he was legally threatened in 2016.

Here is our site on his recommended list in July 2007: